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Current accounts - Money Advice Service Is the money in my current account safe


Money in a U.S. checking account is FDIC insured, so it's "safe" in the sense that you don't have to worry about a run on the bank or going out of business. Purchase fraud is something else entirely -- you need to check with your bank and see what their policy is for unauthorized charges made with your debit card.
But if you are not earning much interest, I generally recommend that as long as you have enough to cover a month's worth of bills, you move the rest to a high-yield savings or money-market account.
Switching current accounts is a great way to save money, as you might be able to find a provider that offers better interest rates or more useful incentives as part of the account. The process also only takes a maximum of seven working days, thanks to the Current Account Switch Service, so you’ll be ready to bank in no time.



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is the money in my current account safe
Money in a U.S. checking account is FDIC insured, so it's "safe" in the sense that you don't have to worry about a run on the bank or going out of business. Purchase fraud is something else entirely -- you need to check with your bank and see what their policy is for unauthorized charges made with your debit card.
As long as you have money in your account, you don’t usually have to pay for current account services. Overdrafts and current accounts. An agreed overdraft is a way of borrowing money from the bank through your current account, allowing you to spend more than you have in your account.

is the money in my current account safe Hi all Everytime I query something re.
Firstly, have they the right to ask why it's there and what I plan to do with it?
And secondly, why do they ask in the first place?
Mainly they read article trying to sell you extra services but they are right that your money can be invested and actually earning you more money.
How much are we talking about here, hundreds or thousands?
Do you need instant access to the money?
Is this long term that you will have that money?
Are you saving for something specific like a house purchase or a car?
I agree that the bank will want to sell you something.
There was a recent Which?
Is it a good idea?
With interest on the floor and inflation at whatever it is your money is losing value over time.
If it was in a more suitable place it wouldn't lose as much of its value.
It's jackpot slots game patcher exercises decision whether that loss is important enough for you to do anything about it; the bank are trying to help you and themselves by encouraging you to make better use of it.
Nothing wrong with that.
It's not really in the bank's interest to do that though.
Thank you for the replies and any is the money in my current account safe ones.
And mainly the money's there to save up for a house.
The thing is that you are earning almost zero interest on that account.
You could put it an an account earning just under 3% You could put it in premium bonds which has an underlying interest rate of 1.
Try this web site to see the best saving accounts The supermarket banks are well worth considering as their interest rates tend to be fairly competitive and in some cases they allow you to deposit and withdraw cash at their stores.
Cash ISA accounts are tax-free but their interest rates tend to be lower to compensate for that, and there are limits on how much you can invest in a year.
Fixed term accounts tend to pay higher interest rates but you must keep the money in them for a period of time.
Normally the longer the time, the higher the interest rate.
Many accounts have a bonus which expires after a year, then the interest rate drops to a very low figure.
That's not a problem provided you remember to shift the money elsewhere once the bonus has expired.
Some financial products have a stock market element.
With them there is a risk that you might lose some or even all of the money.
This comment also applies to the relatively new Peer-to-Peer schemes.
Make sure you fully article source exactly how any financial product works before making any decision.
Make sure that any financial organisation is regulated by the FSA and participates in the FSCS compensation scheme.
Put it in a savings account.
Thats what I do with mine.
When its in current accounts it could be cleared out by someone with your details, and the bank don't always give it back!
I am looking for a good investment for 100k and if any one can show me a better safe place jackpot slots game patcher exercises that sort of money please do.
With the FSCS compensation limit being currently £85,000 it would seem wise to split it across two parent companies different brands within the same parent company count as the same company for the compensation scheme.
If you're happy to is the money in my current account safe the money up for a time, have you looked at?
When its in current accounts it could be cleared out by someone with your details They would need to obtain your security information and log in to your account.
Knowing your sort code and account number wouldn't be enough - that information has been printed on cheques for decades, and anyone wishing to transfer money to you electronically via Faster Payments would legitimately need to know it.
However, most savings accounts are tied to current accounts which can be with a different finanial organisation and money withdrawn from the savings account can only be transferred to the tied current account, so yes that does provide an additional safeguard.
EDIT: The following poster's comment about debit card cloning is a very valid point.
Sorry, I forgot about that.
Hi all Everytime I query something re.
Firstly, have they the right to ask why it's there and what I plan to do with it?
And secondly, why do they ask in check this out first place?
The bank is not trying to sell you something.
It makes very little difference to them if you have your money in a savings account or not.
The only thing they could be accused of is trying to retain your custom.
If you like having lots of money in an account that doesn't pay any jackpot slots game patcher exercises, that's your business, but please also bear in mind that if your debit card is cloned, ALL your money is at risk.
If you keep most of the money in a savings account and several banks do interest-bearing accounts that can be managed on the internetyour account details remain relatively private and your money can't be accessed.
John259, are you looking over my shoulder?
The bank is not trying to sell you something.
It makes very little difference to them if you have your money in a savings account or not.
The only thing they could be accused of is trying to retain your custom.
If you like having lots of money in an account that doesn't pay any interest, that's your business, but please also bear in mind that if your debit card is cloned, ALL your money is at risk.
If you keep most of the money in a savings account and several banks do interest-bearing accounts that can be managed on the internetyour account details remain relatively private and your money can't be accessed Thanks.
And is it possible to have more than one current account with the same bank?
Also, what's the difference between a savings account and a current one?
You may well lose your money if a bank collapsed.
You need to be careful and have accounts with different high street and online banks to protect it.
And is it possible to have more than one current account with the same bank?
Also, what's the difference between a savings account and a current one?
I think you should be able to open two current accounts, but they'd learn more here to be in different names, maybe John Smith-business and John Smith-home, or something, A current account is just a convenient way of making your money a bit safer than carrying it around with you, but always having it available at a moment's notice.
It doesn't earn interest, usually, although some banks do have interest-bearing current accounts hardly worth having, it's so little.
Savings accounts are sometimes automatically linked to your current account, so that you maintain a certain amount in the current account say £500and anything more goes into the savings account.
You can also have internet-operated savings accounts that you can move money into and out of yourself without having to visit a bank.
I don't work for a bank, but I'm old and I've had a lot of bank accounts!!
You may well lose your money if a bank collapsed.
You need to be careful and have accounts with different high street and online banks to protect it.
Only if you have more than £85,000, the current FSCS limit.
And is it possible to have more than one current account with the same bank?
I don't think so, but I'm not sure.
I can't see much point in it for most people.
Current accounts allow you to deposit cash at branches and with some banks, a post officewithdraw cash at branches and ATM's, pay other people or transfer money to saving accounts by writing cheques, direct debits, or Faster Payments.
Also, salaries, pensions and welfare benefits can be paid into current accounts.
In most cases current accounts have zero or extremely low interest rates.
They are mainly intended for day-to-day transactions.
Savings accounts are more restrictive, but pay interest.
There are quite a few different types of saving accounts normal, ISA, Fixed Term, stock market dependant, etc and it's vital to fully understand how they work before putting any money into them.
The web sites of banks and building societies have this information but finding it and ploughing through it is a time-consuming but necessary pain.
However, some companies only allow you to open one account of each type.
I used to keep a fairly large amount in my current account until someone got hold of my debit card details I reckon it was through an online retailer but I never managed to prove it and started using my money to buy flights to Nigeria, mobile phones and similar stuff.
After I got it all sorted with the bank, I started keeping just enough in the account to pay my direct debits and everyday expenses and now keep the rest of my money elsewhere.
This obviously has the effect of limiting the amount you can lose if someone does gain access to your current account.
I also stopped using my debit card online, it's credit card only now!
I am looking for a good investment for 100k and if any one can show me a better safe place for that sort of money please do.
Depends on your attitude to risk and how long you want to keep the money, but with a sum that big I'd invest some of it in stocks and shares ISAs, knowing that I could get back less than I put in.
As I've said on other similar threads recently, IMHO personal finance really should be taught in schools.
It's rather more useful in the real world than quadratic equations.
I used to keep a fairly large amount in my current account until someone got hold of my debit card details I reckon it was through an online retailer but I never managed to prove it and started using my money to buy flights to Nigeria, mobile phones and similar stuff.
After I got it all sorted with the bank, I started keeping just enough in the account to pay my direct debits and everyday expenses and now keep the rest of my money elsewhere.
This obviously has the effect of limiting the amount you can lose if someone does gain access to your current account.
I also stopped using my debit card online, it's credit card only now!
Another thing you can do is to have a credit card only for internet transactions, with a relatively low credit limit.
That way, if it gets cloned, you don't lose the use of your main credit card while things get sorted out.
Depends on your attitude to risk and how long you want to keep the money, but with a sum that big I'd invest some of it in stocks and shares ISAs, knowing that I could get back less than I put in.
Unless you're of retirement age and want to purchase an annuity, put the money somewhere it can grow - there's still a good choice of investments at the safe end of the financial pyramid.
Also, if you're in a position to pay a regular sum into the fund every month, you can offset losses because if the market's low, you buy lots of shares at a low price, and when the market goes up again, you have lots of shares at a much better price!
Having said this, stock market-linked investments need to be for 10 years or more to give the best chance of making some decent money, so if it's a short-term investment, look for a fixed-term bond.
You need to be sure you won't need the money within the term of the bond, but the interest rates are generally better than savings accounts.
I don't think so, but I'm not sure.
I can't see much point in it for most people.
There's no restriction per se, but some banks may be keener than others to dissuade you from opening multiple accounts.
As I've said on other similar threads recently, IMHO personal finance really should be taught in schools.
It's rather more useful in the real world than quadratic equations.
At school in Scotland in the 1950s all the pupils enrolled for a National Savings Bank account, and we put in a little money each week.
This was from about age 8 onwards.
Wasn't much money, but it got us into the habit of saving money, and we could see it grow, so we learned the idea of saving.
There were also these savings stamps this is going WAY back, they had pictures of Princess Anne and Prince Charles on them!
When the book was full, you could cash it in.
Didn't give any interest, but again, you got used to the idea of saving for a rainy day.
These days, kids know a lot more about spending money they haven't actually got than saving what they have, unfortunately.
In my opinion, with stock market investments there's even more need to understand exactly how the product works and what fees and taxes might apply.
Also, never invest more in a risky product than you can afford to lose - assume that you could lose all of it.
Some financial products don't make it clear that they are risky.
For example the word "bond" can mean a fixed term savings account with no risk element other than that associated with a total bank failure of course but it can also refer to a stock market related and therefore risky scheme.
If a financial organisation won't give you a clear answer pokerstars pair tilt account any questions you might have, look elsewhere.
For someone not familiar with these matters, one of the supermarket banks might be a good place to start IMHO.
Anything else goes on the credit card and gets paid off when the bill comes through.
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footnote * For the 10-year period ended December 31, 2018, 9 of 9 Vanguard money market funds outperformed their Lipper peer-group averages. Results will vary for other time periods.


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Total 13 comments.